Kindness

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Kindness reminds us that we’re all in this together.

An act of kindness eases the load or brightens the outlook of another. In performing a kindness, we get an emotional lift, too.

I’ve always sensed that “what goes around comes around.” Kindnesses extended are eventually returned, perhaps not by the same individual or in the same way, or even immediately, but inevitably.

Walking the dogs with my son, we noticed newspapers strewn on a lawn. Apparently the residents had left town without canceling delivery. Not only did the newspapers announce that no one was home, but they were getting dampened by dew.

“Why don’t you pick them up and put them neatly near the front door where they can’t be seen from the street?” I suggested to my son.

“Why?” he asked. I delivered my theories about the gift of kindness.

“OK,” he said, somewhat skeptically. But he stacked the papers and we walked on. “That felt nice,” he said. “You were right about that part.”

Later, we went bike riding. Miles down the bike path, I realized I forgot to bring water. “Mom, I’m thirsty.”

Ahead was a lone, very fancy beachside restaurant. I gave my son $5 to go inside and buy a cola.

At that moment, somewhere in the universe, a force for good was on my side. Within minutes, my little guy burst from the restaurant, his face beaming.

“Mom, Mom! You were right! My kindness came back to me! I got my drink for free and they said to have a nice day!”

Wow, a clear victory in the parental quest to shape a decent human being. To that moment’s designer, a force bigger than me, please accept my deepest gratitude.

I appreciate the kindness.

Kindness reminds us that we’re all in this together.

An act of kindness eases the load or brightens the outlook of another. In performing a kindness, we get an emotional lift, too.

I’ve always sensed that “what goes around comes around.” Kindnesses extended are eventually returned, perhaps not by the same individual or in the same way, or even immediately, but inevitably.

Walking the dogs with my son, we noticed newspapers strewn on a lawn. Apparently the residents had left town without canceling delivery. Not only did the newspapers announce that no one was home, but they were getting dampened by dew.

“Why don’t you pick them up and put them neatly near the front door where they can’t be seen from the street?” I suggested to my son.

“Why?” he asked. I delivered my theories about the gift of kindness.

“OK,” he said, somewhat skeptically. But he stacked the papers and we walked on. “That felt nice,” he said. “You were right about that part.”

Later, we went bike riding. Miles down the bike path, I realized I forgot to bring water. “Mom, I’m thirsty.”

Ahead was a lone, very fancy beachside restaurant. I gave my son $5 to go inside and buy a cola.

At that moment, somewhere in the universe, a force for good was on my side. Within minutes, my little guy burst from the restaurant, his face beaming.

“Mom, Mom! You were right! My kindness came back to me! I got my drink for free and they said to have a nice day!”

Wow, a clear victory in the parental quest to shape a decent human being. To that moment’s designer, a force bigger than me, please accept my deepest gratitude.

I appreciate the kindness.